The Many Lives Of Guilherme Paulus

If you have ever booked a tour to Latin America, you have likely heard of a travel agency called CVC. This giant of the travel industry came from very humble beginnings. When the company first opened up shop in Sao Paulo in 1972, it was just another of many Latin American tourist agencies. But now, they have gradually become the number one tourism agency in the entire region with an annual income of over 5.2 billion.

This agency was founded by a man named Guilherme Paulus. When the business first opened, Mr. Paulus was technically a co-owner of CVC, along with a certain Brazilian politician. However, when his partner left the business, Guilherme Paulus had no choice but to take the wheel himself. There can be no doubt that he steered their ship in the right direction.

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Guilherme Paulus started his career before the age of twenty as a clerk at IBM. After rising to greatness as the de facto leader of CVC, he initiated a partnership with a global private equity firm called the Carlyle Group. In 2009, a deal was brokered which gave the Carlyle Group an interest in the company while providing it with an excellent source of capital for its future. Guilherme Paulus founded a new company called GJP Hotels and Resorts, which now operates quite a few hotels and resorts in Brazil with plans to build many more. On top of all this, Mr. Paulus has also been involved in some charitable work. One of these is the PIET project, which aims at inspiring young people to pursue careers in the tourism industry. Another program that he has helped to support is the Alfasol program, whose goals are similar.

CVC does not plan to stop expanding anytime soon. They have made a lot of progress particularly in areas with low population (meaning less than sixty thousand people). This is an area of the tourism market that is underdeveloped in Latin America, but CVC is working hard to bridge the gap. This will surely bring some much needed income for the people who live in these isolated and (for the most part) impoverished towns.