Closer’ nabs a Diamond for The Chainsmokers

DJ duo the Chainsmokers have reached a point in their music career where they’ve become inseparable from the top of the charts. But their rise to fame came with the single “Closer,” a song that featured pop star Halsey. Two years after its release, the song has moved more than 10 million units, making a diamond-certified single.

Halsey and the Chainsmokers announced the achievement to their followers on Instagram, showing off their brand new plaques that make the milestone official. “Closer’s” status as a hit single had endured for so long that it only lost its position at the top of the Dance and Electronic chart to Zedd’s “The Middle” just a few short months ago.

“Closer” was released near the end of the summer 2016, and quickly it found its place at the very top of the Hot 100. It didn’t move for quite some time, proving the DJ duo had a staying power that they had yet to display. This extended their reach beyond fans of EDM and into the most mainstream charts. Not only was it the top all-genre single 12 times in a row, it solidified its place in history as the fourth longest running top hit in Billboard’s history, beating out the Gorillaz.

Nothing lasts forever. Not even popularity.

Eventually “Closer” was replaced by “Stressed Out” by Twenty One Pilots, but with sales and streams continuing to rise, it was a sign that the duo was now a household name. It even managed to take Halsey, a newcomer to the music industry, and put her front in center as an emerging pop star.

“Closer” proved to be such a hit that it resulted in a couple of Grammy nominations, both for the Chainsmokers and Hasley.

The last time “Closer” was in the news was in March of 2017. After going platinum for the seventh time, evidence that the song had reached international recognition, the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) made it official. While the RIAA’s website hasn’t been updated to reflect this latest development, diamond certification, where a song has gone platinum for the tenth time, they will likely do so soon.

https://open.spotify.com/artist/69GGBxA162lTqCwzJG5jLp

Jeremy Goldstein Solves EPS Problem

Jeremy Goldstein is one of the leading business lawyers in the industry with over 15 years of experience. Many companies seek his legal counsel in regards to employee benefits and related concerns. Goldstein has worked with various independent law firms such as Wachtell, Lipton, Katz, and Rosen.

 

Being involved in transactions with large Fortune 500 companies, including Duke Energy, Verizon, and Goldman Sachs, Jeremy Goldstein has skills that are demanded by the market. Moreover, he is involved with different business and finance committees. He also speaks and writes on corporate governance and executive compensation. Aside from his business ventures, Jeremy Goldstein enjoys helping the community. He is an active member of the Make-A-Wish Foundation, and Foundation House (a charity that helps individuals with mental illness). More recently, Goldstein explained a mutual agreement for employee incentives.

 

There are a plethora of contributing factors that create a workable environment for large-scale companies, but it is difficult to fully address them. Jeremey Goldstein is one of the people who can see this dynamic and that it will cause a struggle between employees and investors. Goldstein offers companies to better utilize their Earnings per Share or EPS, especially in performance-based services.

 

For stockholders, EPS is the most influential factor in determining the quality of investments. Consequently, companies tend to show misuse this important factor when they abuse it. More specifically, the top executives in the company want to project profitability, and the best method they do it is by skewing the results. Aside from the illegal aspects, EPS can significantly deter employees from receiving any incentives.

 

There is a trickle-down effect when stockholders are given a false sense of prosperity. When the mistake is pointed out, the company suffers financially, which essentially means that employees suffer. Many believe that skewing EPS is not a sustainable effort, as it only provides short-term benefits. It is only after companies start working towards long-term investments that they truly prosper. EPS serves only as a virus that boosts profits temporarily but causes large damage in the future. Learn more: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeremy-goldstein-26aa1b4

 

Jeremey Goldstein proposes a solution: a mutual agreement between the anti and pro EPS advocates. While removing the EPS pay-based performance is not ideal, Goldstein suggests that CEOS and top executives be held accountable for their actions. EPS should fit the company goals and its long-term investments.